Bahncard

Garbage collection

Destination: 
Distance: 
710 km

While I could have easily spent some more hours in Düsseldorf (and probably will, next time), today is experiment day. While the last regular direct connection to Berlin starts short before nine, there are two more until the first morning ICE departs: An actual night train, starting in Wuppertal, and demanding an additional boarding fee (AFAIK), and an Intercity. The latter one to leave at half past two – heading for Hamburg. From there, a quite handy ICE connection would take me back to Berlin and to bed almost just within normal night-shift limits.

German Gründlichkeit

11 days. It took Deutsche Bahn already one week (and two reminders I sent in the meantime) to contact me at all. As you probably remember, all I own so far is a paper voucher that has to be accompanied by my ID card – which I really do not want to carry out with me at every time. I want the plastic card.

To boldly go

Destination: 
A temporary Bahncard 100, printed on a legacy ticket voucher

I finally did it. And it would be clearly understated to say I considered this well.

One could say that the idea of purchasing what German Bahn calls “BahnCard 100” – an “all in” frequent traveller card allowing to ride almost any public transportation in this country – first came to my mind a few years ago, when I figured working in Düsseldorf would stay fine if living somewhere else became possible, and my then-company could have been likely to support this idea. They were not, which is why they are “then-“, and disliking Düsseldorf was not even the point.

Truth is: I like change.