User experience

Next stop: Cargo

Destination: 
Distance: 
190 km

Today I encountered a premium example for how deep a bad business strategy can impact. In the case given, one single damaged engine lead to subsequent issues not only in wide parts of western Germany, but even affected international traffic. Trains had to be reorganized up to Amsterdam, Holland, where an “ICE International” train connects to Frankfurt (Main, Germany).

Housekeeping

Destination: 
Distance: 
396 km

I could not wait to leave Vacuum town. I would have gone to any actual city alright, so Leipzig would have been just fine. I slightly missed an Express going just there, and I would never dare blaming the station for lacking any sensible number of normal clocks. I am sure the lavatory fees correspond tightly with fund raising for some new models. And after all I could still do an NTP sync using the free Wi-Fi (ha!) in the station’s “DB Lounge” (ha ha!). You get the point.

Paper(s), please

Destination: 
Distance: 
183 km

Train assembly seems an international issue. Or at least an issue bound to Deutsche Bahn being involved. It seems to difficult to accomplish that an actual car order is displayed on the mostly digital on-platform displays. I stopped counting how many times a train was ordered in opposite directions, and now that I think about it, it was mostly about international trains.

No sand mold sharing for you!

Lucky, mobility without (driving) cars already works in bigger cities. When it comes to, e. g., visiting customers outside urban places, cabs might not only be an expensive yet also a rare option. When days passed slower, you would normally book a rental car (in advance, that is, and thus hardly flexible), pay an unreasonably high amount of money (even more if your trip planning recommends to drop the car at a different place from where you picked it up) and act like a legacy car-owner, only in part-time.